08/01/2021

Not Attracting Top Performers? How to Make Your Company Stand Out.

Drake International

Not Attracting Top Performers?  How to Make Your Company Stand Out

High performers have a track record of getting the job done. Researchers have found they can deliver up to 400% more productivity than average employees. Regularly called upon to tackle difficult projects, it is no wonder that organisations have a good reason to covet them.

Today, it’s not enough to simply offer flexible working choices, as that is becoming the norm. So what else can you do to stand out from your competitors to attract these star performers?  First of all, you must have a deliberate plan to attract, recruit, and retain them. Here are some key tips to follow:

  • Promote a work environment that encourages autonomy

Top performers don’t want to be micromanaged, and nor do they want to be ignored. Set expectations, offer support, provide feedback, and then get out of the way and let them thrive.

Be known as a company who supports and encourages employees to use their skills and strengths and provides them with the resources and tools they need to excel. This is an important lure in attracting the talent you want and getting them onboard.

  • Communicate your career development philosophy

Talented candidates are attracted by compelling opportunities to learn new skills for on-going career development.  It is no longer an optional perk; it is expected by today’s talent.

A career development philosophy starts within by understanding the goals, aspirations, and motivators of your current employees. Find out what skills and experience they want to build that correspond to your business objectives and then establish a learning path for their career growth.

According to a LinkedIn Workforce Learning Report, 93% of employees would stay at a company longer if it invested in their careers. This is important for top candidates, a retention priority, and a win for everyone. Communicate your learning culture at every opportunity.

  • Draw them in through your Employee Value Proposition (EVP)

Your EVP is much more than the compensation and full range of tangible benefits you offer such as holidays and sick days. What other rewards are you offering? To entice the candidates you want to attract, it is the intangible benefits you offer that will get attention. Focus on your intangibles such as your culture, work environment, and opportunities to grow to promote your company as a top employer.

  • Build an employee-centric culture

 A work culture where everyone is watched and where creativity is suppressed won’t attract top talent or boost productivity. An employee centric culture is an environment where employees take pride in their work, feel valued, and are encouraged to make suggestions.

To build an employee focused culture, encourage ideas and free-flowing communication. Ensure employees are respected and feel safe when they share ideas and make suggestions for improvement. Be proud of your employees’ achievements and take the time to recognise them. Your ability to attract and retain the best depends on it.

  • Demonstrate you value your employees

All employees are valued, but your top performers are valued even more based on their productivity and importance. How you treat your employees overall is reflected in your company’s reputation and your success in attracting star candidates.

Showing appreciation can be done in any number of ways such as: telling them why they made a difference; showing you trust them; upgrading tools and software; being honest and transparent; and taking the time to connect and ask how they are doing.

Top performers want to make an impact and believe in the work they are doing. Being known as a workplace that puts an emphasis on team motivation within a supportive, and positive environment is a smart way to make your company stand out to attract and hire the star talent every organisation wants.

Hiring top talent is not a matter of luck

Creating and identifying your company as a place where top performers are valued, can make an impact, and grow, is critical in your attraction, hiring, engagement, and retention strategy.

Also critical is having a hiring process in place that identifies the top performers who would be a perfect fit for your organisation from the many other candidates who apply.

And we can help you do just that!

Drake’s Top Performer Profiling solution profiles your current top performers to:

  • Determine the behaviours, styles, and preferences that fit your unique culture and business environment
  • Understand the knowledge and experience your top performers have
  • Assess their skills and abilities that differentiate them from the rest

From Top Performer Profiles through to every aspect of the hiring process, Drake’s Talent Management Solutions will support you at every step from attracting, hiring, onboarding, engagement, and retention.

Contact Drake at 13 14 48 to attract and hire your next top performers.


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